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In many respects, my work is a sort of anti-entropy. I focus on the otherness of space in order to prevent its ultimate dissolution, promoting a spatial practice of radical alterity.

Alterity is in danger. It is a masterpiece in peril, an object lost or missing from our system…[1]

There is a crisis of alterity in which otherness is threatened by its opposition to a system of exchange. An artistic effort towards radical alterity is a practical one. It combines experience of real space with strategies of asyndetic fragmentation and mobility as a production of perception of
the world as Other. This strategy advances discovery of the adumbrational potentialities of site, ultimately breaking the cyclical system of exchange that causes everything to disappear. I suggest a rethinking of the way we utilise space—a radicalised and unique praxis. For centuries, artists focused first on the representation of space and later on the viability of site—both acts towards disappearance into pure concept. Contemporary practices engage in the production of art as entertainment, capital, or at least as something slick. This has left the body count of site (amongst other elements) in the wake of art’s murderous utility.

...the visual arts have remained by the wayside as the entire culture is now being threatened by the extermination of space…[2]

I suggest the extermination of space is more precisely a transfiguration of site into a known and utilised place. It represents a movement into realised place, and a disappearance of the original space that once was. It has been consumed as a product into the system of difference and absorbed into homogeneity. Rather than a mediated practice whereby previous artists respond to space as commodification, I propose a different practice. One that preserves (and produces?) the alterity of unnamed space as an act towards singularity—a singular space that resists the urge towards homogeneity.



1 Baudrillard, J., 2008, Radical Alterity, Semiotext(e), Los Angeles, CA.
2 Virilio, P. & Lotringer, S., 2005, The Accident of Art, Semiotext(e), New York. P. 29





michael lent

www.michaellent.net